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50 Best Hazard Pictogram Resources and GHS Label References: The Top Articles, Guides, Official Documents, and More on Hazard Pictograms and GHS Requirements

Last Updated: July 2, 2019

When OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), the goal was to unify labels and classifications of chemicals. Companies must use the proper labels to comply with OSHA’s regulations, which include displaying required information and other elements on the labels themselves. One of the label requirements is a pictogram, or GHS hazard symbol, that visually represents hazardous products. Pictograms group products according to risk level and communicate the type of risk in three categories: environmental risk, chemical/physical risk, and health risk. The nine pictograms each represent certain risks in one or more categories.

Because companies must comply with OSHA’s GHS requirements, it is essential that you understand the ins and outs of the pictograms and GHS itself. To help you ensure compliance, and to help you prepare workers to understand the hazard pictograms and labels they come across, we have rounded up 50 of the best hazard pictogram resources and GHS label references available. Our top resource picks are from government agencies, leading companies, and other authorities and include articles, fact sheets, official documents, and several other types of information sources. To simplify your search, we have categorized our 50 best hazard pictogram and GHS label resources and then alphabetized the resources within each category; thus, the resources are not ranked or rated in any way.

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Articles

1. GHS Hazard Classification, Pt. 1: Everything You Need to Know
@ERAenvironment

GHS Hazard Classification Pt 1 Everything You Need to Know

ERA Environmental are experts in risk management, environmental reporting, compliance, SDS-GHS, health, and safety. The first of a three-part series on GHS Hazard Classification, this article outlines the process you need to undergo when classifying your hazardous chemicals.

Three key points from GHS Hazard Classification, Pt. 1: Everything You Need to Know:

  • Chemical manufacturers, importers, and distributors are required to update the ways in which they classify and communicate their products’ hazards
  • After determining the class and category of your product’s hazards, assign signal words, pictograms, and precautionary statements
  • When classifying mixtures, use available testing data for the mixture itself in addition to the GHS classification guidelines

Cost: FREE

2. GHS Labels: What They Look Like and What They Mean
@LearnAtVivid

GHS Labels What They Look Like and What They Mean

An online safety training company, Vivid Learning Systems helps save lives in high-risk environments and makes life easier for safety professionals. Their hazard pictogram article provides an overview of the nine pictograms under the GHS and their corresponding hazards.

Three key points from GHS Labels: What They Look Like and What They Mean:

  • The final Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires eight of the nine pictograms because the environmental hazards are not within OSHA’s jurisdiction
  • All hazard pictograms should be in the shape of a diamond
  • Pictograms must have red frames, and the red frame is required regardless of whether the shipment is domestic or international

Cost: FREE

3. New Hazard Labels and Legislation
@RSC_EiC

New Hazard Labels and Legislation

From the Royal Society of Chemistry, Education in Chemistry magazine presents news, articles, and resources for chemistry teachers. Bob Worley’s EiC article explores the pictograms, signal word, hazard statements, and precautionary statements.

Three key points from New Hazard Labels and Legislation:

  • All countries in the United Nations committed t the GHS, which includes material safety data sheets and easily understood symbols
  • Three of the pictograms contain completely new symbols: gases under pressure, the exclamation point, and the health hazard
  • Pictograms may be accompanied by signal words alerting users to the severity of the hazard; for example, “danger” indicates severe hazards and “warning” indicates less severe hazards

Cost: FREE

4. OSHA Adopts GHS – Now What?
@OccHealthSafety

OSHA Adopts GHS Now What

Occupational Health & Safety magazine is a trusted source of information for safety and health professionals in the United States. Glenn Trout’s OH&S article emphasizes the need for employers to train employees on GHS formats, especially because of the new pictograms.

Three key points from OSHA Adopts GHS – Now What?:

  • To comply with HazCom 2012, manufacturers and distributors must reclassify their chemicals and provide GHS-formatted safety data sheets and labels to downstream users
  • Compliant HazCom 2012 labels include six mandatory elements: product identifier, supplier identification, signal word(s), hazard statement(s), precautionary information, and pictogram(s)
  • OSHA provides the exact language and symbols that should be used on labels based upon chemical classification for signal words, hazard statements, precautionary information, and pictograms

Cost: FREE

5. OSHA and DOT Issue Joint Memorandum on Hazardous Chemicals
@JacksonLewisPC

OSHA and DOT Issue Joint Memorandum on Hazardous Chemicals

Jackson Lewis P.C. is a law firm with attorneys in major cities across the United States serving clients in a broad range of practices and industries. One way the firm helps people is providing insight and commentary on occupational safety and health issues in their OSHA Law Blog. For example, Tressi L. Cordaro’s article covers the joint memorandum issued by OSHA and the Department of Transportation (DOT) after there was confusion about the labels required when transporting certain substances.

Three key points from OSHA and DOT Issue Joint Memorandum on Hazardous Chemicals:

  • OSHA considers DOT diamond-shaped placards containing hazard symbols to be pictograms that comply with the requirements of the revised Hazard Communication Standard
  • OSHA allows labels to contain both DOT pictograms and the HCS pictograms for the same hazard
  • For hazards that don’t require a DOT label, there must be a HCS pictogram to comply with the HCS requirements

Cost: FREE

6. OSHA Answers Questions About GHS Styled Labels and Blacking Out of Pictograms
@MSDSonline

OSHA Answers Questions About GHS Styled Labels and Blacking Out of Pictograms

MSDSonline provides on-demand environmental health and safety solutions that empower your company to manage safety compliance programs from any internet-connected computer. They address questions they have received about complying with the GHS rules, particularly the questions about labels and pictograms, in this article.

Three key points from OSHA Answers Questions About GHS Styled Labels and Blacking Out of Pictograms:

  • The use of blank red frame on labels in not permitted; however, blank red frames may be blacked out as long as the blank red frame is completely covered and filled in
  • To help downstream users realize that blank pictograms have been blacked out rather than defaced, consider adding the words “See Adjacent Program(s)” to the blacked-out area
  • In cases where a shipped container already has a DOT label, the HCS pictogram for the same hazard does not need to appear on the label

Cost: FREE

7. Understanding HAZCOM 2012 Part 3: OSHA vs. DOT Hazard Labels… Who to Follow?

Understanding HAZCOM 2012 Part 3 OSHA vs DOT Hazard Labels Who to Follow

Focus Systems released a three-part series to help readers understand HazCom2012. In this third part of the series, regulatory director Jack E. Shea addresses the question of DOT and OSHA label confusion.

Three key points from Understanding HAZCOM 2012 Part 3: OSHA vs. DOT Hazard Labels… Who to Follow?:

  • Pictograms must consist of a red square frame in a diamond shape with a black hazard symbol on a white background
  • DOT diamond-shaped labels containing hazard symbols for transporting chemicals are considered pictograms under HCS 2012, but HCS square pictograms do not replace the DOT diamond-shaped labels; DOT labels must be placed on the outside of shipping containers and meet DOT requirements in 49 CFR 172, Subpart E
  • DOT has updated its regulation stating that GHS pictograms do not conflict with DOT labels

Cost: FREE

8. What GHS Hazard Communiation Labels Mean to Workers
@LabManager

What GHS Hazard Communiation Labels Mean to Workers

Lab Manager provides lab professionals with the latest trends, innovations, and insights. This Lab Manager article centers on how GHS hazard communication labels affect workers and the responsibility employers have to ensure workers have a clear understanding of the labels and the hazards they represent.

Three key points from What GHS Hazard Communication Labels Mean to Workers:

  • Under HCS 2012, chemical manufacturers and importers must provide on any chemical a label including a signal word, pictogram, hazard statement, and precautionary statement for each hazard class and category
  • If a chemical contains the health hazard pictogram, it may contain carcinogens, be known for mutagenicity (capable of causing permanent genetic changes that can be passed from parent to child), have reproductive toxicity, be a respiratory sensitizer, have target organ toxicity, have aspiration toxicity, or be a simple asphyxiant
  • The irritant pictogram means that the chemical may be a skin or eye irritant, be a skin sensitizer, have harmful acute toxicity, have narcotic effects, or be a respiratory tract irritant

Cost: FREE

9. Your Guide to the New Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals
@Envirox_Clean

Your Guide to the New Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals

EnvirOx provides a healthier, safer cleaning solution for people and the environment. In this article, EnvirOx provides a complete overview of GHS and its impact on chemical labeling. The article also provides helpful visuals to break down labels and explain pictograms, signal words, hazard statements, and precautionary statements.

Three key points from Your Guide to the New Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals:

  • Employers must update your HazCom program to include GHS standards and train staff, update safety data sheets, and ensure compliance in product labeling
  • Distributors and manufacturers must ensure chemicals have correct, compliant labeling with pictograms and make updated safety data sheets available to your product users
  • As of June 2016, employers out have updated alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication programs in place and provided employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards

Cost: FREE

Fact Sheets, General Information, and Guides

10. WHMIS 2015 – Pictograms
@CCOHS

WHMIS 2015 Pictograms

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) is Canada’s national resource for advancing workplace health and safety. Their fact sheet, WHMIS 2015 – Pictograms, alerts readers that the country has aligned the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) with the GHS and covers the new requirements.

Three key facts from WHMIS 2015 – Pictograms:

  • Pictograms immediately show individuals using hazardous products which type of hazard is present
  • Pictograms include exploding bomb, flame, flame over circle, gas cylinder, corrosion, skull and crossbones, health hazard, exclamation mark, and environment
  • Pictograms will appear on product supplier labels and on safety data sheets

Cost: FREE

11. The 9 Hazard Communication Standard Pictograms
@BLR_EHS

The 9 Hazard Communication Standard Pictograms

BLR EHS provides comprehensive state and federal compliance information for environmental, health, and safety professionals. This general information resource provides a look at the nine hazard pictograms and the hazards they represent.

Three key facts from The 9 Hazard Communication Standard Pictograms:

  • The flame pictogram represents flammables, pyrophoric, self-heating, emits flammable gas, self-reactive, and organic peroxides
  • The skull and crossbones pictogram represents acute toxicity that may be fatal or toxic
  • The corrosion pictogram represents skin corrosion/burns, eye damage, and corrosive to metals

Cost: FREE

12. Chemical Hazard Classification – Safety Library
@Illinois_Alma

Chemical Hazard Classification Safety Library

The Division of Research Safety at the University of Illinois presents this GHS fact sheet. The document provides an overview of the new requirements as opted by OSHA, including the legal requirements, GHS label elements, GHS hazard classes, and safety data sheets (SDS).

Three key facts from Chemical Hazard Classification – Safety Library:

  • Beginning in June 2015, all manufacturers are required to prepare labels and SDS according to GHS
  • The main health and physical hazards of products must be indicated on the product label using pictograms, signal words, and standardized hazard statements
  • The severity of the hazard within the classes of health and physical hazards are described by category, and the higher the category number, the lower the hazard

Cost: FREE

13. CLP Pictograms – ECHA
@EU_ECHA

CLP Pictograms - ECHA

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) works for the safe use of chemicals and is a regulatory agency of the European Union. This general information resource explains the switch from former regulations to the CLP Regulation for classifying and labeling hazardous chemicals and introduces the CLP pictograms that align with the GHS. It also features a humorous video that emphasizes the need to learn and understand the dangers conveyed by the pictograms.

 

Three key points from CLP Pictograms – ECHA:

  • You may find the former orange and white pictograms on older products, and you need to heed their warnings just as you do those from the new hazard pictograms
  • Know what to look for on hazardous products: new CLP pictograms align with the GHS and are in the shape of a diamond with a red frame, white background, and black hazard symbol
  • More than one pictogram may appear on a product, because products may pose more than one hazard

Cost: FREE

14. Danger: Chemicals! The Hazard Pictograms Explained
@EU_OSHA

Danger Chemicals The Hazard Pictograms Explained

The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) makes Europe a safer, healthier, and more productive place to work. In this leaflet, available in several languages, EU-OSHA works and European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) explain the new hazard pictograms using Napo, the hero in a series of animated films introducing workplace safety and health in humorous, memorable ways. Readers will also find a link to the video that inspired the leaflet.

Three key points from Danger: Chemicals! The Hazard Pictograms Explained:

  • If you see the gas under pressure pictogram, keep in mind that even normally safe gases pose a danger when pressurized
  • Be sure to know the differences between the flame and flame over circle pictograms: the flame warns about flammable gases, aerosols, liquids, and solids, while the flame over circle means you are dealing with oxidizing gases, solids, and liquids that can cause or intensify fires and explosions
  • Remember, the corrosion pictogram means that the substance can cause sever skin burns and eye damage in addition to being corrosive to metals

Cost: FREE

15. GHS – What You Need to Know
@SafeWorkSA

GHS What You Need to Know

SafeWork SA is South Australia’s work health and safety and state industrial relations agency. Their GHS fact sheet reminds Australians that full implementation of GHS should have occurred by January 1, 2017, and that it replaces the Approved Criteria for Classifying Hazardous Substances for workplaces.

Three key facts from GHS – What You Need to Know:

  • As of January 1, 2017, SDS and labels must comply with GHS, and workplace chemicals must be classified in accordance with the new system in Australia
  • Under Australian Work Health and Safety Laws, GHS pictograms may be substituted with correct ADG class labels where both the GHS pictogram and ADG class label represent the same hazard
  • Labels should contain as many pictograms as apply to the substance

Cost: FREE

16. GHS and OSHA Hazard Communication Virtual Summit Frequently Asked Questions
@NSCsafety

GHS and OSHA Hazard Communication Virtual Summit Frequently Asked Questions

The National Safety Council (NSC) eliminates preventable deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education, and advocacy. They present this information sheet, a collection of frequently asked questions and answers, upon the close of the GHS and OSHA Hazard Communication Virtual Summit.

Three key facts from GHS and OSHA Hazard Communication Virtual Summit Frequently Asked Questions:

  • Secondary containers must have the same information as the original label, and you may add hazard class or number under the “Supplemental Information” heading
  • If you have old chemical containers, you are required to update the labels. However, if you have old chemicals in inventory and the manufacturer no longer is in business or you have stopped receiving shipments from the supplier, you do not have to update them to comply with GHS
  • Product and container labels must have the product identifier, supplier identification, hazard pictograms, signal words, hazard statements, precautionary statements, and supplemental information such as directions for use and expiration date

Cost: FREE

17. GHS Pictogram Training Cheat Sheet
@EHSDailyAdv

GHS Pictogram Training Cheat Sheet

EHS Daily Advisor provides practical environmental, health, and safety tips, news, and advice. Their hazard pictogram cheat sheet serves as a quick reference guide for employees or anyone who will come into contact with hazardous chemicals.

Three key facts from GHS Pictogram Training Cheat Sheet:

  • The gas cylinder pictogram means that the substance is compressed, liquefied, or dissolved gas under pressure at 29 pounds/square inch or more
  • The environment pictogram is not mandatory; it means the hazard the chemical present is aquatic toxicity
  • The exploding bomb pictogram appears on chemicals that are explosives, self-reactive, or organic peroxides

Cost: FREE

 

18. GHS Precedence Rules for Pictogram, Signal Words, and Hazard Statement

GHS Precedence Rules for Pictogram Signal Words and Hazard Statement

ChemSafetyPro.com is a group of experts working to develop original and free chemical safety and regulatory tutorials and references to help regulatory professionals and those new to the industry find chemical compliance information and safety requirements for their products and businesses. This informational resource examines rules for chemicals classified with multiple hazards.

Three key facts from GHS Precedence Rules for Pictogram, Signal Words, and Hazard Statement:

  • For health hazards, the exclamation point pictogram should not appear if the skull and crossbones pictogram applies
  • When “danger” applies, do not use “warning”
  • Many authorities have limited the number of precautionary statements on labels to make them more readable, so you must know how to select the most relevant precautionary statements on a label

Cost: FREE

19. The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication (GHS)
@usequantum

The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication GHS

Quantum Compliance offers environmental, health, and safety compliance and sustainability software and GHS compliance services. Their guide to GHS provides a comprehensive overview of the regulations and emphasizes that all chemicals in the United States must follow the OSHA GHS standards and all companies must have converted old material safety data sheets to the new safety data sheet format.

Three key points from The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication (GHS):

  • Labels must now include the standard signal word, pictogram, and hazard statement in addition to precautionary statements
  • Companies should have implemented new employee training rules aligned with OSHA GHS
  • Labeling is a critical component of the GHS format because it ensures employees can determine the potential dangers and precautions they need to take to use or transport a chemical correctly

Cost: FREE

20. Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram
@UABNews

Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is a world-renowned research university and healthcare center. Their guide to hazard pictograms includes a list of the pictograms and their associated hazards as well as a sample label to help you know how to create yours in order to comply with GHS.

Three key facts from Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram:

  • Hazard pictograms should appear in the upper right corner of the label, not obstructed by any text
  • Signal words should be listed clearly beneath the pictograms
  • Provide supplemental information on the label as needed, such as directions for use

Cost: FREE

21. Hazard Communication Standard: Pictograms – Environmental Health & Safety
@TuftsUniversity

Hazard Communication Standard Pictograms Environmental Health and Safety

A student-centered research university, Tufts is committed to helping students and faculty generate bold ideas, innovate, and become active citizens. Their informational sheet provides a brief introduction to hazard pictograms and contains links to more information.

Three key points from Hazard Communication Standard: Pictograms – Environmental Health & Safety:

  • It is important to recognize the pictograms and the hazard they communicate, even if you don’t know the pictogram’s official name
  • Pictograms represent categories of hazards
  • Refer to the pictogram(s) and the signal words to know the exact risk substances pose

Cost: FREE

22. HazCom and GHS FAQs
@JJKeller

HazCom and GHS FAQs

J. J. Keller & Associates offer regulatory compliance solutions to the transportation, human resources, workplace safety, construction, and Hazmat markets. They present HazCom and GHS frequently asked questions with links to more information about the revised standard, labels, safety data sheets, and training in this robust resource.

Three key points from HazCom and GHS FAQs:

  • Hazard communication labels on shipped containers must include a product identifier, pictogram, signal word, hazard statement, precautionary statement, and the name, address, and telephone number of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party
  • Chemical manufacturers, importers, and distributors must label containers of hazardous chemicals with the identity of the chemical, appropriate hazard warnings, and the name and address of the manufacturer or other responsible party
  • OSHA does not have a limit on the number of precautionary statements that appear on the label, but they do allow for some flexibility when identifying the appropriate precautionary statements for labels

Cost: FREE

23. Info Sheet #1 – Pictograms
@HazComSociety

Info Sheet 1 Pictograms

The Society for Chemical Hazard Communication (SCHC) is a professional society committed to serving chemical hazardous communication professionals. Their informational sheet about pictograms offers a brief overview of pictograms in general and distinguishes between pictograms and symbols. It also clearly shows when pictograms and symbols are required under GHS.

Three key points from Info Sheet #1 – Pictograms:

  • Under GHS, the pictogram is a graphical representation including a certain symbol, border, and color to convey a specific information
  • Safety data sheets and GHS labels may have different pictogram requirements
  • Where transport pictograms are required, the GHS pictogram does not have to appear

Cost: FREE

24. The (M)SDS HyperGlossary: Pictograms

The MSDS HyperGlossary Pictograms

Presented by Interactive Learning Paradigms Incorporated, The (M)SDS HyperGlossary includes an in-depth look at hazard pictograms and their relationship to safety data sheets and GHS. This resource is interactive and contains links to a variety of sources and other information.

Three key facts from The (M)SDS HyperGlossary: Pictograms:

  • Hazard pictograms are a required label element on any material shipped from a chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party
  • Hazard pictograms must be in the shape of a square set at a point (a diamond) and include a black hazard symbol on a white background with a red frame that is wide enough to be clearly visible
  • Only one hazard symbol may be depicted by one pictogram

Cost: FREE

25. New Labelling for Hazardous Substances
@SussexUni

New Labelling for Hazardous Substances final

Former Technical Services Manager at the University of Sussex, Dr. Teresa Knapp presents New Labelling for Hazardous Substances, a guide to classifying, labeling, and packaging substances and mixtures in compliance with GHS. The document includes the timeline for implementation and explores the differences that arose with the adoption of GHS.

Three key points from New Labelling for Hazardous Substances:

  • There is no single word describing the hazard
  • The word “preparation” has been replaced with the word “mixture”
  • All pictograms relating to transport are governed by the Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations (UK) and DOT (United States)

Cost: FREE

26. P&G Professional, GHS and You
@ProcterGamble

P&G Professional, GHS and You

You don’t have to be a P&G employee to benefit from this Procter & Gamble resource. The information includes background on the GHS, OSHA, safety data sheets, the Hazard Communication Standard, and GHS pictograms, and you can access links to quick overview of GHS and OSHA resources from within the resource itself.

Three key points from P&G Professional, GHS and You:

  • The final Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires eight of the nine pictograms because OSHA’s jurisdiction does not include environmental hazards
  • You may not use a black border on pictograms for domestic shipments; red frames are required regardless of whether the shipment is domestic or international
  • OSHA no longer allows blank red boarders on pictograms; all pictograms must have a symbol printed inside to provide maximum recognition and impact of warning labels

Cost: FREE

27. Pesticide Labels and GHS: Comparison and Samples
@EPA

Pesticide Labels and GHS Comparison and Samples

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides this guide to the impact of GHS on pesticide labels. Currently, EPA does not require GHS for pesticide product classification and labeling and GHS hazard statements and pictograms do not appear on pesticide product labels sold and distributed in the country.

Three key points from Pesticide Labels and GHS: Comparison and Samples:

  • If EPA adopts GHS, signal words, pictograms, and hazard statements would simplify the hazard communication and result in safer transportation, handling, and use of pesticides
  • EPA uses two pictograms at present: a version of the skull and crossbones for the most severe categories of acute toxicity and a flame symbol for certain highly flammable pesticides
  • GHS reduces costly and time-consuming activities needed to comply with multiple classification and labeling systems and promotes consistency in regulation

Cost: FREE

28. A Visual Guide to HazCom Pictograms, Chemical Labels, and SDS

A Visual Guide to HazCom Pictograms, Chemical Labels, and SDS

ZING Green Products presents this guide to hazard pictograms, labels, and safety data sheets in relations to HazCom 2012. As the guide states, OSHA’s HazCom standard is integrated with the GHS and provides a universal chemical classification system. The guide serves as an overview of the standard, offers visual examples, and provides an in-depth discussion of chemical labels.

Three key points from A Visual Guide to HazCom Pictograms, Chemical Labels, and SDS:

  • Hazard pictograms must include standardized images that indicate the type of hazard a given chemical poses
  • Hazardous chemical labels may require more than one pictogram
  • Training employees is a critical part of your HazCom program, and you should incorporate hands-on, supervised training that gives employees concrete examples and encourages them to ask questions

Cost: FREE

29. When Do You Need to Comply with GHS Regulations?
@Nalco_News

When Do You Need to Comply with GHS Regulations

An Ecolab company, Nalco Water is reinventing the way water is managed. Their guide to GHS and pictograms reminds you that you need to comply as soon as you begin using products that are classified and labeled under GHS.

Three key points from When Do You Need to Comply with GHS Regulations?:

  • The former OSHA Hazard Communication Standard has been revised to align with the GHS standard, so it replaces existing hazard communications
  • Product labels reflect the switch to the GHS by using new pictograms to describe the hazard of concern in products, signal words, and hazard and precautionary statements
  • GHS pictograms, signal words, and hazard statements should be displayed in section 2 of safety data sheets, and hazard information and pictograms should be displayed on product labels

Cost: FREE

Official Documents

30. Annex 3 – Codification of Hazard Statements, Codification and Use of Precautionary Statements and Examples of Precautionary Pictograms
@UNECE

Annex 3 Codification of Hazard Statements, Codification and Use of Precautionary Statements and Examples of Precautionary Pictograms

The official documentation for hazard pictograms comes from the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) in the form of Annex 3. In it, you will find official definitions, descriptions, hazard statement codes, and more.

Three key policies from Annex 3 – Codification of Hazard Statements, Codification and Use of Precautionary Statements and Examples of Precautionary Pictograms:

  • Hazard statement codes are for reference only and should not be used to replace hazard statement text
  • All assigned hazard statement should appear on the label unless otherwise specified
  • For GHS, there are five types of precautionary statements: general, prevention, response, storage, and disposal

Cost: FREE

31. OSHA Proposed Rule Changes for Hazard Communication
@USDOL

OSHA Proposed Rule Changes for Hazard Communication

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) proposed in September 2009 to modify its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). This official document states the proposal for the rule change and provides insight into the thought process behind the proposal.

Three key points from OSHA Proposed Rule Changes for Hazard Communication:

  • OSHA determined the switch to GHS would improve the quality and consistency of information provided to employers and employees regarding chemical hazards and the associated protective measures
  • One goal of aligning with the GHS was to ensure employees were more aware of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed
  • OSHA hoped to reduce the incidence of chemical-related occupational illness and injuries by changing the rules to follow the GHS

Cost: FREE

32. OSHA Publications – Globally Harmonized System (GHS)
@USDOL

OSHA Publications Globally Harmonized System GHS

A collection of official publications from OSHA, this resource includes hazard communication regarding safety data sheets, standard labels, standard pictograms, training requirements, and more. Rather than search for these publications separately, find them all here.

Three key documents from OSHA Publications – Globally Harmonized System (GHS):

Cost: FREE

Printable Resources and Visual References

33. Chemical Hazards: Comparison of New and Old Symbols
@UniOfYork

Chemical Hazards Comparison of New and Old Symbols

For companies or individuals working in the UK, the switch to GHS involves moving from the former Chemicals Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply (CHIP) symbols to the new Classification, Labelling, and Packaging (CLP) pictograms. This visual reference, from the University of York, provides a simple comparison of the old and new labels to help people make the transition.

Three key points from Chemical Hazards: Comparison of New and Old Symbols:

  • The CHIP symbols did not include compressed gas
  • The CLP exclamation point replaces the CHIP black X
  • Do not confuse the new CLP skull and bones with the former CHIP skull and bones; by GHS standards, the skull and bones pictogram represents acute toxicity that could be fatal

Cost: FREE

34. GHS Pictogram

GHS Pictogram

ChemSafetyPro.com offers GHS Pictogram, which is a printable resource that you can download and edit as you wish for training purposes or any other use within your organization. The resource also details the various classes of physical hazards, health hazards, and environmental hazards.

Three key points from GHS Pictogram:

  • There are 17 classes of physical hazards, 10 classes of health hazards, and two classes of environmental hazards
  • To choose the correct hazard pictogram for a chemical, first determine the hazard class and category
  • After classifying a chemical, find the assigned standard signal word, hazard pictogram, hazard statements, and precautionary statements

Cost: FREE

35. GHS Pictograms
@MSDS_Authoring

GHS Pictograms

MSDS Authoring provides safety data sheet authoring and writing services. They provide GHS Pictograms as a quick visual reference for GHS label requirements.

Three key points from GHS Pictograms:

  • A chemical’s hazard classification determines which pictograms need to appear on its label
  • All employers that fall under the HazCom standard should be trained in the hazard pictograms and provide appropriate training for employees
  • Download the GHS pictogram poster as a reference for employees

Cost: FREE

36. Hazard Communication – Pictograms
@UofNH

Hazard Communication Pictograms

The University of New Hampshire is “a flagship public research university on the edge of possibility.”  Their Hazard Communication – Pictograms resource is a visual reference for the hazard pictograms and provides brief information about the GHS requirements.

Three key facts from Hazard Communication – Pictograms:

  • Each label must contain pictograms to alert users of chemicals about the hazards to which they may be exposed
  • Labels may have one or multiple pictograms, depending on the classification of the chemical substance
  • The environmental pictogram is not mandatory under the revised OSHA standard because environmental risks fall outside the jurisdiction of the OSHA; they are the responsibility of the EPA

Cost: FREE

37. Hazard Communication Pictograms
@USDOL

OSHA Hazard Communication Pictograms

OSHA provides Hazard Communication Pictograms, a printable resource that you can download. Users also can adjust the size of each pictogram, which will remain proportional. You may use this resource for training or labeling purposes.

Three key points from Hazard Communication Pictograms:

  • When printing, keep in mind the pictograms must be set at a point (in the shape of a diamond)
  • The red frame of each pictogram must be side enough to be clearly visible
  • A square red frame set at a point without a hazard symbol is not a hazard pictogram and is not permitted on a label

Cost: FREE

38. Hazard Pictograms
@H_S_E

Hazard Pictograms

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) works to prevent death, injury, and ill health in Great Britain’s workplaces. They also provide this visual reference to help people make the transition from the old CHIP symbols to the new GHS-aligned CLP hazard pictograms.

Three key points from Hazard Pictograms:

  • The CLP hazard pictograms are similar to those used in the CHIP labeling system, but they must be in the shape of a diamond with a distinctive red border and white background
  • Hazard pictograms alert you to the chemicals you may come into contact with that could harm you or the environment
  • More than one pictogram may appear on a label of a single chemical

Cost: FREE

39. Hazard Pictograms (GHS/CLP)
@msdseurope

Hazard Pictograms GHS CLP

MSDS – Europe prepares, translates, and adapts safety data sheets in addition to providing REACH and GHS/CLP services. Their printable resource, Hazard Pictograms (GHS/CLP), makes the pictogram available for download in GIF, EPS, or TIF form.

Three key facts from Hazard Pictograms (GHS/CLP):

  • The CLP regulation aligns with the GHS and introduces a new classification and labeling of chemicals within the European Union (EU)
  • You have a responsibility to identify the hazards of chemicals and classify them before they hit the market for the first time
  • If a substance or mixture is hazardous, you must supply it with a label to inform employees and consumers about the hazards before the first use of the chemicals

Cost: FREE

40. OSHA QUICKCARD: Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram
@USDOL

OSHA QUICKCARD Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram

OSHA offers quickcards as references for several of their policies and regulations. This quickcard defines hazard pictograms and lists the requirements of them to comply with the Hazard Communication Standards.

Three key points from OSHA QUICKCARD: Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram:

  • Pictograms must appear on labels to alert users of chemical hazards they may be exposed to
  • Each chemical’s hazard classification determines its pictogram(s) on the label
  • HCS pictograms include the health hazard, flame, exclamation mark, gas cylinder, corrosion, exploding bomb, flame over circle, environment, and skull and crossbones

Cost: FREE

41. WHMIS 2015 and the New GHS Hazard Pictograms
@chemscapesafety

WHMIS 2015 and the New GHS Hazard Pictograms

Chemscape develops innovative technologies across the chemical safety landscape to elevate an organization’s occupational health standards. Their visual hazard pictogram reference explains Canada’s Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), the national hazard communication standard, in relation to the GHS hazard pictograms.

Three key points from WHMIS 2015 and the New GHS Hazard Pictograms:

  • Chemicals may need to be classified as physical and health hazards
  • Health hazard pictograms include health hazard, skull and crossbones, exclamation mark, and corrosion
  • Physical hazard pictograms include gas cylinder, exploding bomb, flame, and flame over circle

Cost: FREE

Online Courses, Presentations, and White Papers

42. GHS Hazcom for Employees
@eduwhere

GHS Hazcom for Employees

Eduwhere offers online compliance training that you can participate in anytime, anywhere. Their GHS Hazcom for Employees course helps protect workers who are exposed to hazardous chemicals.

Key Features:

  • Instant access
  • Certificate, wallet card, and scoresheet
  • Accepted by OSHA

Cost: $29

43. GHS Labeling: A Global Survey

GHS Labeling A Global Survey

Chemical Safety Consulting has decades of experience in managing sustainability, best practices in health, safety, and environmental policy, and product stewardship. Christine Lepisto’s Chemical Safety Consulting presentation on GHS labeling examines labels in Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas.

Three key facts from GHS Labeling: A Global Survey:

  • In Europe, labels are called CLP labels; substances must have a CLP label when placed on the market, and mixtures may have a CLP label when delivered with CLP SDS, according to REACH 2010 Annex II
  • The same container must never contain former orange square CHIP labels and current red diamond CLP pictograms
  • In the United States, OSHA does not establish minimum label or pictogram sizes

Cost: FREE

44. GHS PowerPoint – Hazard Communication

 

GHS PowerPoint Hazard Communication

From Querbes & Nelson, a risk management firm, the GHS PowerPoint – Hazard Communication presentation is part of a training covering the basics of the changes to the Hazard Communication Standard. The presentation encourages workers who come into contact with hazardous chemicals to undergo training to improve workplace safety.

Three key points from GHS PowerPoint – Hazard Communication:

  • Hazard communication training is required for any workplace where chemicals are present and used in a way that may expose workers to them under normal conditions or in an emergency situation
  • Employees have the right to know and the right to understand the hazard of each chemical
  • The Hazard Communication Standard of 2012 requires employers to train employees in the proper handling of hazardous materials to prevent harmful exposure

Cost: FREE

45. Hazard Communication: New GHS
@CLYMtraining

Hazard Communication New GHS

CLYM Training, a division of Clym Environmental Services, LLC, is an online safety compliance solution for OSHA’s revised HazCom Standard. They offer engaging, focused compliance training for a variety of environmental, health, and safety topics, such as the Hazard Communication: New GHS course.

Key Features:

  • Provides a description of the changes to hazard warning labels and safety data sheets
  • Includes a comparison of the former standards and the new GHS requirements
  • Convenient, affordable web-based training options for organizations of any size

Cost: $10

46. Hazard Communication: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200
@maine_labor

Hazard Communication OSHA 29 CFR 1910 1200

SafetyWorks! helps Maine workers prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths while reducing related costs. They specialize in practical solutions to improve the health and safety of workplaces, which is why they share this presentation on OSHA Hazard Communication. The presentation provides background on the switch to the GHS, an introduction to the changes the switch brings about, and the new label requirements and hazard pictograms.

Three key points from Hazard Communication: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200:

  • Benefits of adopting the GHS include increasing the consistency of information and reducing confusion to increase comprehension of hazards
  • Thanks to the GHS, labels are more defined and require especially critical information such as a pictogram, signal word, hazard statement, and precautionary statement
  • Employers are not required to classify chemicals unless they choose not to rely on the classification performed by the manufacturer and importer for the chemical to satisfy the requirement

Cost: FREE

47. Introducing the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) to Victorian Workplaces
@WorkSafe_Vic

Introducing the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) to Victorian Workplaces

WorkSafe Victoria works to deliver outstanding workplace safety and ensure Victorian workers return home safe each day. Their GHS presentation is designed to help workplaces ensure they are ready for GHS implementation.

Three key points from Introducing the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) to Victorian Workplaces:

  • In Victoria, GHS implementation occurs via the OHS Regulations and the Dangerous Goods (Storage and Handling) Regulations
  • The sixth revised edition of the GHS will become effective in Australia January 1, 2018
  • The GHS replaces existing workplace hazardous chemical classification and labeling systems; however, the GHS does not replace the ADG Code for Dangerous Goods during transport

Cost: FREE

48. Labeling Requirements Under the New OSHA Global Harmonization Standard

Labeling Requirements Under the New OSHA Global Harmonization Standard

Compliance Services International (CSI), a leading regulatory consultancy, provides innovative solutions for organizations faced with regulatory and environmental challenges. Dr. Rob Harrington’s OSHA GHS labeling presentation provides an in-depth look at the GHS and the requirements for labels, classifications, and employee training.

Three key facts from Labeling Requirements Under the New OSHA Global Harmonization Standard:

  • The hazard classification provides specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards of substances and mixtures
  • As of June 2016, OSHA enforcement starts in the U.S., and employers must update all labels and HazCom programs and provide additional training for workers on newly identified physical or health hazards
  • You can use consumer-labeled products in the workplace, but the employer must assess whether the products are used in the same manner as a consumer would use them

Cost: FREE

49. New Supplement to Hazard Communication Training – The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)
@Stockton_edu

New Supplement to Hazard Communiation Training - The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)

Stockton University, known as New Jersey’s distinctive public university, is among the top 10 Public Regional Universities in the North for 2018 according to U.S. News and World Report. They also have made available their GHS classification and labeling presentation, which could be used as a training resource by another institution or organization.

Three key points from New Supplement to Hazard Communication Training – The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS):

  • Hazard pictograms must contain a hazard symbol to be permitted on the label
  • OSHA pictograms do not replace the DOT’s labels required for transporting chemicals, including those on chemical drums, in chemical totes, or those in tanks or other containers
  • It’s important not to confuse DOT labels with OSHA GHS labels; GHS label pictograms must be a square set on a point with a visible red frame

Cost: FREE

50. What You Really Need to Know About GHS: A Practical Guide to Navigating the MSDS to SDS Transition
@HSI_Brands

What You Really Need to Know About GHS A Practical Guide to Navigating the MSDS to SDS Transition

The Health & Safety Institute family of companies includes SafeTec. They offer several GHS resources, including this white paper that serves as a guide to navigating the 2012 HazCom Standard, new labeling criteria, and transition from MSDS to SDS.

Three key points from What You Really Need to Know About GHS: A Practical Guide to Navigating the MSDS to SDS Transition:

  • GHS symbols have been incorporated into pictograms for use on GHS labels
  • Where a transport pictogram appears, the GHS pictogram for the same hazard should not appear
  • It is important to OSHA that employees have training to gain an understanding of the GHS labels, hazard pictograms, and new safety date sheets to protect them in case of a spill, exposure, or other incident

Cost: FREE with email registration

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